Are Slip-and-Fall Accidents Really a Big Deal?

Are Slip-and-Fall Accidents Really a Big Deal

Slipping on a puddle of water or a banana peel that’s been carelessly tossed on the floor might seem like no big deal. That is until you see your medical bills. Then you realize the income you lost while recovering from your injuries has put you in a precarious financial position. So, some people might consider slip-and-fall accidents to be a minor problem and even funny, but nothing could be further from the truth.

Common Causes of Slip-and-Fall Accidents

The name says it all – someone is injured because they slipped and fell. Sometimes, these accidents are just accidents, and it seems that no one is at fault. But it’s more likely that someone else’s negligence caused your mishap.

In fact, here are some of the most common causes of slip-and-fall accidents:

  • Slippery substances (wet or dry), including water, oil, dust, and gravel left on the floor
  • Carpets and floor mats that are frayed, bunched up, or placed in inappropriate locations
  • Wood flooring that slippery, buckled, or missing pieces.
  • Concrete or cement that’s uneven or loose
  • Electrical cords and cables that have been left uncovered
  • Boxes and other objects left in a walkway or aisle
  • Missing handrails, warning signs, or proper lighting

People who encounter one or more of these conditions could suffer injuries ranging from minor to life-threatening.

Common Injuries

According to the National Floor Safety Institute (NFSI), accidents involving slipping and/or falling result in more than 1 million visits to the emergency room annually.  Slip-and-fall injuries can cause:

  • Cuts and bruises,
  • Sprains and strained muscles,
  • Broken bones,
  • Spinal cord injuries,
  • Brain trauma

In fact, fall-related injuries are the “second leading cause of injury-related death…” for people aged 65 to 84.

How much you recover and from whom may depend on where your slip-and-fall accident happened.

Premises Liability and Your Accident

Location matters with slip-and-falls. For example, if you fall at a store, the owner or manager of the store could be held liable for your accident. However, residential property owners are also expected to provide as safe an environment as possible for visitors. Generally, the person who owns or controls a location can be held accountable under premises liability laws.

Property ownership is not enough to justify a party’s liability for your injuries. Typically, negligence must be involved. Determining whether a property owner is liable for your injuries requires in-depth knowledge of personal injury law. So, talk to an attorney before making any claims or attempting to sue someone over your accident.

Potential Damages You Might Include in Your Slip-and-Fall

If you do decide to pursue a personal injury claim, you might be eligible for the following types of damages:

  • Current and future medical treatment,
  • Lost wages and lost earning ability,
  • Pain and suffering, and
  • Additional expenses caused by your injuries, like hiring someone to handle tasks beyond your abilities because of your injuries.

Like most personal injury claims, compensation for a slip-and-fall accident varies widely. An experienced Florida personal injury attorney can explain what you might expect from your claim.

Discuss Your Slip-and-Fall Injuries with an Experienced Personal Injury Attorney

If someone else’s negligence has hurt you, you need help from top-rated, hard-working representation. At Shapiro|Delgado, our attorneys put their injury law experience to work for you. And we handle cases on a contingency basis, which means we don’t get paid unless you do.

We represent clients throughout Florida, including Sarasota, Bradenton, Tampa, Saint Petersburg, Pinellas County, and surrounding communities.

To set up a free personal consultation, call 941-954-4000 or use our convenient online contact form.

Your family counts on you.
You can count on us.

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